From the moon to mass production: 10 pieces of modern tech indebted to Apollo
Digitaltrends.com - Sun 21 Jul 16:36 GMT

This article is part of , a multi-part series that explores the technological advances behind Apollo 11, their influence on modern day, and what's next for the moon. You may have heard that freeze-dried food was invented to feed astronauts on the Apollo missi…

  Illustrations by Chris DeGraw This article is part of Apollo: A Lunar Legacy, a multi-part series that explores the technological advances behind Apollo 11, their influence on modern day, and what’s next for the moon.

  You may have heard that freeze-dried food was invented to feed astronauts on the Apollo missions, and although “astronaut ice cream” was never actually used during the operations, it was developed for NASA in the 1960s.

  Power tool company Black Decker debuted its first cordless power drill in 1961 and, soon after, NASA approached the company about creating a cordless rotary hammer drill which could be used for the Apollo program.

  Kidney Dialysis In order to provide drinking water for the long space missions, NASA needed a system to purify and recycle water.

  MRIs In the mid-‘60s, as a prelude to the Apollo Lunar Landing Program, NASA developed digital image processing so that computers could enhance images taken on the moon.

  It is based on the Spring Tire developed by Glenn Research Center and Goodyear, which was first inspired by the tires found on the Lunar Roving Vehicle deployed during later Apollo missions.

  So next time you slip on your comfortable sneakers or use a cordless vacuum, remember that you have the moon landing to thank for your modern technology.